Formula to Add Leading Zeros in Excel

To make a set of numbers of varying length into strings with the same number of characters, try using the TEXT formula.  This formula won’t handle strings, so if you need to add leading zeros to an alphanumeric identifier you might have to try modifying the VBA formula pasted at the end.

Here’s an example: =TEXT([Number to add trailing 0's],”Put a 0 to match the desired length”)

So if you’re trying to make “1″ six digits long, you would put six zeros in a row like: “000000″.

2-18-2014 11-43-00 AM

 

If you’re trying to do the same thing on an alphanumeric string, try adding this custom formula into your workbook.  After you paste the code into a VBA module, you can call it by typing addZeros([the Alphanumeric string], [desired length of string])

So for example: =ADDZEROS(“AA”,4) will result in 00AA

Here’s the code:

Public Function addZeros(makeLonger As String, numberDigits) As String
    Dim x
    'Adds 0's to the front of the number until it's the correct length
    'Change "0" to another character if you need a different character than 0
    For x = 1 To (numberDigits - Len(makeLonger))
        makeLonger = "0" & makeLonger
    Next x
    addZeros = makeLonger
End Function

Control + Alt + Delete in Remote Desktop

So when you’re remoted in another computer with Windows Remote Desktop Application pressing Control +  Alt + Delete to bring up the task manager, to change your password, or to log off, you’ll pull it up on the main computer instead of the remote computer.

To get around this press : Control + Alt + End, sometimes Control + Alt + Home will work too.

Tl;Dr: On a remote desktop Ctrl + Alt + Del = Ctrl + Alt+ End or Ctrl + Alt + End

Excel – VBA to Select Columns in VBA with Numbers instead of Letters

So say you want to select a couple columns through a loop and you need to be able to iterate through columns numerically; so you would need to select a range numerically.

Here’s the simple way:

Columns(“A:B”).Select

Range(Columns(1), Columns(2)).Select

Excel – Close and Save active workbook in VBA with no Prompt

This VBA code will save an Excel workbook file and close it when it runs.  You could put a button or some other trigger on your worksheets to initiate the macro so that it’s easier for your users to access the macro.

Instructions to Install VBA to Save Workbook with No Prompt

Step 1: Copy paste this Save and Close VBA macro in to a new module

Sub SaveAndClose()
    ActiveWorkbook.Close SaveChanges:=True
End Sub

Step 2: Make whatever changes you want to the worksheets / workbook.

Step 3: Run the macro and it will save the changes that you made and close the work book.

[Excel] Vlookup in VBA

Using a Vlookup in VBA for your macros isn’t as straight forward as you would think.  The trick is that Vlookup is a worksheet function that you need to reference using the Application variable in VBA, when you code your macro.

Note: If you’re looking for something similar for Access VBA, it’s called Dlookup.

There are a couple ways of calling up a vlookup in a macro, both should work.

Application.VLookup(Range("A3"), Range("A3:B9"), 2, False)

Or

Application.WorksheetFunction.VLookup(Range("A3"), Range("A3:B9"), 2, False)

 

[Excel] How to ulock a protected Excel Worksheet, Step by Step

If you’re like me, you might have a tendency to forget passwords. I always have good intentions on trying to keep workbooks secure and the formatting and data stable, and sometimes those efforts fall flat when I forget the password. Or you might have gotten the worksheets from someone else and they’re might have forgotten the passwords, just like I do. So if you need to unlock the password protection on a worksheet here’s some quick and easy instructions on using a macro to help you unprotect the sheet.

Please don’t use these steps for unlawful purposes. Also these steps will only work for password protected sheets, which are the ones you can’t edit but you can still see the data on them.

For advanced users you can skip straight to the code on step 3.

Step 1: Press ALT + F11 on your keyboard to open up the Visual Basic Editor

Step 2: Click on [Insert] then [Module]

Step 3: Copy & Paste this code into the module window that pops up:

Sub PasswordBreaker()
    'Breaks worksheet password protection.
    Dim i As Integer, j As Integer, k As Integer
    Dim l As Integer, m As Integer, n As Integer
    Dim i1 As Integer, i2 As Integer, i3 As Integer
    Dim i4 As Integer, i5 As Integer, i6 As Integer
    On Error Resume Next
    For i = 65 To 66: For j = 65 To 66: For k = 65 To 66
    For l = 65 To 66: For m = 65 To 66: For i1 = 65 To 66
    For i2 = 65 To 66: For i3 = 65 To 66: For i4 = 65 To 66
    For i5 = 65 To 66: For i6 = 65 To 66: For n = 32 To 126
    ActiveSheet.Unprotect Chr(i) & Chr(j) & Chr(k) & _
        Chr(l) & Chr(m) & Chr(i1) & Chr(i2) & Chr(i3) & _
        Chr(i4) & Chr(i5) & Chr(i6) & Chr(n)
    If ActiveSheet.ProtectContents = False Then
        MsgBox "One usable password is " & Chr(i) & Chr(j) & _
            Chr(k) & Chr(l) & Chr(m) & Chr(i1) & Chr(i2) & _
            Chr(i3) & Chr(i4) & Chr(i5) & Chr(i6) & Chr(n)
         Exit Sub
    End If
    Next: Next: Next: Next: Next: Next
    Next: Next: Next: Next: Next: Next
End Sub

Just like this:

Step 4: Go back to the password protected sheet and press ALT + F8

Step 5: Select the PasswordBreaker macro and click run.  It takes a little while to run, but it should do the trick!

Have two Excel Workbooks Open at the Same Time

I know that this is one of my pet peeves. If you open multiple workbooks in Excel, they all get stuck together in the same window, and it’s hard to do split screens or multiple monitors.

Thankfully there’s an easy way to get two (or more) independent windows of Microsoft Excel to open. All you have to do is open Excel from your start menu each time you want an independent instance of Excel to run, and then open the worksheet in your new program window.

Volia! Two ribbons, two spreadsheets, and you can drag them around to two different monitors if you please.  They can finally be two different sizes, and whatever else you need them to do.  One minor downside though, is that referencing cells between the 2 instances of Excel doesn’t work.

[Cheatsheet] VBA String Functions

Function What Does it do? Example Result
Len(str) Returns the length of the string Len(“Hello”) 5
Ucase(str) Changes the string to upper case Ucase(“Hello”) HELLO
Lcase(str) Changes the string to lower case Lcase(“Hello”) hello
Left(str, num) Shorten the string from the left Left(“Hello”,3) Hel
Right(str, num) Shorten the string from the right Right(“Hello”,3) llo
Mid(str, start, length) Extract the middle of a string Mid(“Hello”,2,2) el
Instr(start, look in this string, find this string) Find if a string is in another string Instr(0,”Hello there”,”Hello”) 1
Trim(str) Removes preceding and trailing spaces Trim(” hello there “) hello there
LTrim(str) Removes spaces from the beginning of a string Ltrim(” hello “) hello
Rtrim(str) Removes spaces from the end of a string Rtrim(” hello “)  hello
String(num, char) Repeats the char num times String(2, “a”) aa
Space(num) Makes a certain num of spaces Space(2)
Cint(str) Change a string to a integer Cint(111.1) 111
Clng(str) Change a string to a long (use if you get an overflow error) Clng(111.1) 111
Cdbl(str) Change a string to a double Cdbl(111.1) 111.1
Split(str,delimiter) Split a string into an array Split(“Hello,There,Friend”, “,”) (0) = Hello
(1) = There
(2) = Friend
Join(array, delimiter) Join an array into a string Join(array(“Hello”, “There”, “Friend”),”,”) Hello,There,Friend

Simple Regular Expression Tutorial for Excel VBA

I’ll go through a simple tutorial for using regular expressions for VBA.  This is a great quick start guide for people who have used regular expressions before in other languages.  Just as a review, regular expressions are used to match patterns in strings.  This is a powerful tool that can help you data cleanse and data mine.  The directions are the same for Microsoft Access as well.

First thing first, let’s enable the reference in Excel so that we can use this functionality.

Go to Tools > References

Then find Microsoft VBScript Regular Expressions 5.5

Click Ok, and now you’ll be able to create a RegExp object to use in your VBA.

Here’s a basic function that finds 5 letter words in a string.

Here’s a copy of the Excel file that I am using in the example: RegEx Excel Tutorial XLS File

Function findFiveLetter(sentence)
    Dim regEx As New VBScript_RegExp_55.RegExp
    Dim matches, s
    regEx.Pattern = "\W\w{5}\W"
    regEx.IgnoreCase = True 'True to ignore case
    regEx.Global = True 'True matches all occurances, False matches the first occurance
    s = ""
    If regEx.Test(sentence) Then
        Set matches = regEx.Execute(sentence)
        For Each Match In matches
            s = s & " Position: " & Match.FirstIndex
            s = s & " Word: " & Match.Value & " "
            s = s & Chr(10)
        Next
        findFiveLetter = s
    Else
        findFiveLetter = ""
    End If
End Function

Now let’s break it down.

First you need to declare your regEx obejct with:

Dim regEx As New VBScript_RegExp_55.RegExp

Next you give your object some parameters.

The most important is .Pattern, which is the pattern of characters that you want your function to find.  Then there are a couple of settings like Global, if you want it to search for all occurrences (TRUE) or just the first occurrence (FALSE), and also IgnoreCase.

Here’s a simple guide to get you started on writing regex patterns.

regEx.Pattern = "\b\w{5}\b"
    regEx.IgnoreCase = True 'True to ignore case
    regEx.Global = True 'True matches all occurances, False matches the first occurance

Now to test if the pattern has been found in a string you can use

regEx.Test(sentence)

To get an array of matches from your regex you simply have the regex execute.

Set matches = regEx.Execute(sentence)

To get the results from this array object, you can reference matches(n) or use a For Each loop. There are two important pieces of information returned in the array, the index of the match and the actual match.

I used a For Each:

For Each Match In matches
            s = s & " Position: " & Match.FirstIndex 'Position of the match
            s = s & " Word: " & Match.Value 'The actual match
            s = s & Chr(10) 'Prints a new line
        Next

Here’s the example output:

Line Matches
What began as a small group of protesters expressing their grievances  Position: 5 Word: began
Position: 16 Word: small
Position: 22 Word: group
Position: 53 Word: their
about economic inequities last month from a park in New York City  Position: 0 Word: about
Position: 31 Word: month
has evolved into an online conversation that is spreading across the harry  Position: 69 Word: harry
country on social media platforms.  Position: 18 Word: media

Here’s a copy of the Excel file that I used in the example: RegEx Excel Tutorial XLS File
The regex function is called findFiveLetter(“put a string in here”)

Basic Regular Expression Patterns for Beginners

This is super simplified, but it’s enough to get started with. I remember being confused by the gigantic tables with all the special clauses, so when you’re beginning keep it simple.

Remember if you want to match a literal character you can just type it out, unless there’s a special character. Special characters have meanings in regex patterns, so you need to type a \ in front of them if you want to specifically match them in the pattern.

Common special characters are: + . \ – [] {} $ ? |

Example: If I wanted to match taste, taster, tasters, I would type a pattern like taste\w{0,2}

If I wanted to match taste!, I would write a pattern like taste\!

Code What does it Match?
\d Numbers
\w Word characters like letters of any case
\s Spaces
\b Boundary of a word character
\D Not a number
\W Not a word character
\S Not a space
\n Line break
\r Line break
\t Tab
? Previous code is optional
* Repeat previous code 0 to infinity
+ Repeat previous code once or more
{1} Repeat previous code once (can use any number)
{1,2} Repeat previous code 1 to 2 times (can use any numbers)